About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5
was not a sport it was a means for waging war. in 2001, ktvu's bob mackenzie brought us the story of the legendary tenth mountain division. >> reporter: in their time they were legendary soldiers. the men of the tenth mountain division could ski, climb mountains, use stealth and hit hard and fast. >> i think it was the best fighting force, it was the only fighting force that i experienced and i can't imagine any fighting force being any better. >> reporter: 60 years later some of the tenth mountaineers get together. sometimes they tell war stories sometimes as a way as exorcises the ghost. >> when we passed him, his brains were just laying out on the ground it was a horrible sight. >> reporter: in 1939 at the outbreak of world war ii, adolph hitler began conquering the nations one by one. when president roosevelt enforced the idea of the fighting force the newly formed tenth mountain division began to train. most were college men already skiers or mountain climbers, athletes by inclination and many had the naive idea that the training was going to be fun. >> you had to learn to cope with the altit
entered world war i it was supplying half of the oil required to fight the war. the use of oil revolutionized the way war is waged. oil fueled the planes, tanks, trucks and ships that fight wars. the end of the war actually increased the world's need for oil. by of the war, america was consuming oil faster than america could produce. the competition was stiff especially from the british and dutch oil interest. in 1919 american companies were spending $400 million in marketing and oil refining by 1925 they were spending a billion dollars on exploration alone. at home oil began to literally gush. production doubled from 1918 to 1923. by 1929 it had tripled and passed the billion barrel mark for the first time. but the greatest oil discovery was yet to be made. standard oil company of california discovered oil on the tiny island of bahrain. success there convinced saudi arabian king. the agreement was for 66 years. but the saudi desert was proving to be as barren as it looked. after six years of searching they found oil in saudi arabia and the rest is history. >> the subsidiary t
's book silent spring and john muir bfs book's book the yosemite and wat an watson brought us this history in 2000 of yosemite. >> molding and carving yosemite. the signature on this sculpture was written by a 60 long glacier that chisels its way leaving yosemite valley in its wake. half dome, and all this right here in this small valley is almost too much to take in. it is enormous and about the size of the state of rhode island. almost 4 million people visited last year and you might be tempted to ask are we loving yosemite to death? greedy ravages of man have been the big threat. >> what we have here in yosemite, we have the best of the best and the worst of the wours. we have the scenery and the water falls and 800 miles of hiking trails. but we have hoards and hoards of people coming. so i think john muir never advocated keeping people out. >> the limits of transportation kept people out of yosemite's harm. by there start of the 20th century, progress was pushing its heavy shoulder in yosemite. >> i think it was the train, it build a line up the river and it was the first time people
for homecoming. elizabeth pran first brought us this story on christmas eve last year. >> daddy, daddy. >> reporter: an emotional reunion at naval air station woube island in washington state. >> i love you. >> reporter: the final men and lady of the yellow jacket squadron returned to their families home for good from iraq. >> just in time for christmas. >> we worked hard to make sure that happened and we're here. it's a good day i think for everybody. >> reporter: just last week a caravan of u.s. soldiers and supplies crossing the border from iraq into kuwait marking the last american combat troops to leave after almost nine years of fighting. now at fort hood texas, tears and relief as these nearly 200 soldiers marched toward their families. they are among the very last u.s. combat soldiers to leave the country and return home. >> it feels great. i'm real happy. it's been almost a whole year and i'm just ready to get home and spend some good time with my family. >> reporter: their return these families say is simply the best gift. >> just to have your son and your fiance out of harm'
guide the niners to three super bowl wins. when walsh died in 2007, ktvu joe fonzi brought us this look back at his career. >> reporter: his greatest football accomplishments came as the coach of the 49ers, but bill walsh's bay area roots run much deeper. born in fremont and a graduate of san jose state, his first coaching job was at fremont's washington high. he advanced to the staffs of both cal and stanford before landing in the nfl in 1996 with al davis and the raiders. the expansion cincinnati bengals were next on the list where he served under the legendary paul brown and an old school football man who passed on walsh when it was time to name a successor, leaving the bengals for a year in san diego before getting his first chance as a head coach. >> and there were those in the league that did not think i was head coach material to let everybody know it, including paul brown, who i had worked for. so it was difficult all the way through. then my big break, of course, they came at stanford university. >> paul brown's loss was stanford's game. under walsh, they won successive bowl ga
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)